Force-extension measurements on bacterial flagella.

Fluorescent filaments on a stuck cell. Fluorescent filament leaving bundle. Fluorescent cells near the slide. Fluorescent semi-coiled bundle. Fluorescent curly 1 bundle. Fluorescent bundles. Fluorescent bundles, 500 Hz. Movies, cells in phase contrast. Cells near the slide, then above the slide. Reference. Turner, L., Ryu, W.S. and Berg, H.C.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments of Rhizobium lupini H13-3: Flagellar Rotation and pH-Induced Polymorphic Transitions Article in Journal of Bacteriology 184(21):5979-86.

Characterization of chemotaxis and motility response.

An Escherichia coli cell transduces extracellular stimuli sensed by chemoreceptors to the state of an intracellular signal molecule, which regulates the switching of the rotational direction of the flagellar motors from counterclockwise (CCW) to clockwise (CW) and from CW back to CCW. Here, we performed high-speed imaging of flagellar motor rotation and show that the switching of two different.Howard C. Berg. Herchel Smith. (the proximal hook) to a thin helical propeller (the flagellar filament). The motor derives its energy from protons driven into the cell by chemical gradients or electrical fields. The direction of the motor rotation depends in part on signals generated by sensory systems, of which the best studied analyzes chemical stimuli. Our research group is trying to.I have been intrigued by bacterial flagellar motors since 1973, when Bob Anderson and I argued that bacterial flagellar filaments are rigid helices driven at their base, rather than flexible structures that propagate bending waves (1); although, the physics of thrust generation is essentially the same (2). This realization, that bacterial flagella actually rotate, came more than ten years.


A tumble involves not only a change in the direction of rotation of one or more of the flagellar filaments, but also a sequence of changes in their handedness and pitch.. Rotary Motor Flagellar Motion Flagellar Filament. Turner, L., W. S. Ryu, and H. C. Berg. 2000. Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments. J. Bacteriol. 182.Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments of Rhizobium lupini H13-3: Flagellar Rotation and pH-Induced Polymorphic Transitions. In view of these novelties, fluorescence labeling was used to analyze the behavior of single flagellar filaments during swimming and tumbling, leading to a model for directional changes in R. lupini. Also.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

A study of flagellar growth revealed that filament growth is independent of length. Cells of Escherichia coli strains carrying flagellin serine-to-cysteine substitutions were grown, labeled with a green Alexa Fluor maleimide dye, grown a second time, and labeled with a red Alexa Fluor maleimide dye.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching.. flagellar filaments. Nature 245. Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Flagellated bacteria possess a remarkable motility system based on a reversible rotary motor linked by a flexible coupling (the proximal hook) to a thin helical propeller (the flagellar filament). The motor derives its energy from protons driven into the cell by chemical gradients or electrical fields.

Coordinated Reversal of Flagellar Motors on a Single.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments. By Linda Turner, William S. Ryu and Howard C. Berg. Abstract. Bacteria swim by rotating flagellar filaments that are several micrometers long, but only about 20 nm in diameter. The filaments can exist in different polymorphic forms, having distinct values of curvature and twist.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

This is real-time imaging of a flagellar polymorphic change under a fluorescent microscope. A normal filament was changed to a coiled filament at 0.9 sec, subsequently, the filament wound around.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

The peritrichous flagella of Salmonella are synthesized and function through many cell generations. There are two different aspects in the relationship between flagellar biogenesis and cell divisio.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Live-cell imaging allows the visualization of cellular processes using time-lapse microscopy.Structural changes and physiological processes can be observed in real-time. Other common microscopy techniques such as immunofluorescence usually require cell fixation and permeabilization, which shows only a snapshot of the cells at a certain timepoint and might lead to artefacts.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Real-time imaging of a flagellar polymorphic change under a fluorescent microscope. A normal filament was changed to a coiled filament at 0.9 sec, subsequently, the filament wound around its cell.

Deformation of a helical filament by flow and electric or.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Abstract. Dynamic changes of cytoplasmic and cortical actin filaments drive various cellular and developmental processes. Although real-time imaging of actin filaments in living cells has been developed, imaging of actin filaments in specific cells of living organisms remains limited, particularly for the analysis of gamete formation and early embryonic development.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

The flagellar hook is a flexible universal joint that transmits motor torque to the filament in its various orientations that change dynamically between swimming and tumbling of the cell upon switching the motor rotation for chemotaxis. Although the structures of the hook and hook protein FlgE from different bacterial species have been studied, the structure of Salmonella hook, which has been.

Real-time imaging of fluorescent flagellar filaments

Flagellated bacteria possess a remarkable motility system based on a reversible rotary motor linked by a flexible coupling (the proximal hook) to a thin helical propeller (the flagellar filament). The motor derives its energy from protons driven into the cell by chemical gradients or electrical fields. The direction of the motor rotation depends in part on signals generated by sensory systems.